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The famous Penang Road chendol that everyone has to have when they are in Penang is a great refreshing treat on a hot day!

This Teochew-style chendol comes with green chendol jelly made from scratch with pandan leaves, plump red kidney beans, and served in fresh creamy coconut milk topped with finely shaved ice and finished with a generous drizzle of gula melaka.
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Kuantan Nasi Lemak starts off with fragrant coconut rice perfumed with pandan. The rice is partnered with various side dishes of a chicken wing perfectly fried, half a hard-boiled egg, slices of cucumber, crispy fried ikan bilis and peanuts, and complemented with a side of spicy sambal.
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Kuantan Nasi Lemak starts off with fragrant coconut rice perfumed with pandan. The rice is partnered with various side dishes of a chicken wing perfectly fried, half a hard-boiled egg, slices of cucumber, crispy fried ikan bilis and peanuts, and complemented with a side of spicy sambal.
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Fried Kway Teow, more commonly known as Char Kway Teow (Hokkien for “stir-fried flat rice noodles”), is one of the most popular hawker dishes in both Singapore and Malaysia.

Here, we serve the Penang version that is less sweet and not as heavily-flavoured as its Singaporean counterpart. This Penang Yong Kee Char Kway Teow stall serves such noodles prepared with a traditional recipe from a famous hawker in Malaysia, stir-fried over very high heat with soy sauce, specially-concocted chilli paste, eggs, prawns and assorted ingredients.
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Petaling Street Claypot Chicken Rice is cooked over a charcoal stove, giving the dish the earthy aroma of charcoal. The flavours of the rice and ingredients are bound together in a clay pot with a mix of dark soy sauce and sesame oil.

The fragrant rice is topped with marinated chicken chunks, Chinese sausage, Chinese mushroom and salted fish, and finished with a sprinkling of freshly chopped spring onion. At the bottom of the clay pot, you will be able to find a delicious crisp, crusty layer, which is the hallmark of a good claypot rice.
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Petaling Street Claypot Chicken Rice is cooked over a charcoal stove, giving the dish the earthy aroma of charcoal. The flavours of the rice and ingredients are bound together in a clay pot with a mix of dark soy sauce and sesame oil.

The fragrant rice is topped with marinated chicken chunks, Chinese sausage, Chinese mushroom and salted fish, and finished with a sprinkling of freshly chopped spring onion. At the bottom of the clay pot, you will be able to find a delicious crisp, crusty layer, which is the hallmark of a good claypot rice.
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Chilli Pan Mee is a Malaysian ban mian (wheat noodle) served dry unlike the soupy ones we often see in Singapore.

It keeps you addicted with the aromatic and delicious chilli mix. The slightly springy noodles also pair well with the mix of ingredients (minced pork, stewed Chinese mushrooms, spinach, ikan bilis, and a runny poached egg) for a delicious bowl of noodles.
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Our KL Wanton Noodles is made up of springy egg noodles tossed in a concoction of sweet and savoury dark sauce, accompanied with wanton (pork and shrimp chinese dumpling) and flavourful thin slices of roasted char siew (barbequed pork).

 

What makes the wanton noodles from KL different from the ones in Singapore is the use of delectable dark sauce and the addition of crispy pork lard. We also use the same sauce that the KL stall uses for its special recipe.
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Our KL Wanton Noodles is made up of springy egg noodles tossed in a concoction of sweet and savoury dark sauce, accompanied with wanton (pork and shrimp chinese dumpling) and flavourful thin slices of roasted char siew (barbequed pork).

 

What makes the wanton noodles from KL different from the ones in Singapore is the use of delectable dark sauce and the addition of crispy pork lard. We also use the same sauce that the KL stall uses for its special recipe.
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The KL Hokkien Mee is widely different from the Hokkien Mee found in Singapore. The dish is made of thick udon-like noodles stir-fried in good dark soya sauce that boosts its flavour.

 

KL-lites adore this dish of glistening black noodles, and Singaporeans can now also enjoy this dish in proximity at Malaysia Boleh!.
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The key to a good Loh Mee is in its gravy – a thick starchy one made with a rich stock that has a mix of spices and ribbons of egg beaten in.

 

The Penang Loh Mee starts with a rich flavourful gravy that is ladled onto mee (yellow egg noodles), and topped with ingredients including juicy braised pork, and crispy fried scallions.
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The key to a good Loh Mee is in its gravy – a thick starchy one made with a rich stock that has a mix of spices and ribbons of egg beaten in.

 

The Penang Loh Mee starts with a rich flavourful gravy that is ladled onto mee (yellow egg noodles), and topped with ingredients including juicy braised pork, and crispy fried scallions.
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Ipoh is famous for its Bean Sprout Chicken Kuitew (flat rice noodles) and Rice. We prepare this dish with the recipe from the famous ‘Restoran Ayam Taugeh’ stall in Buntong, which name directly translates to “Restaurant Chicken Bean Sprout”.

 

The signature set is served in three components – the smooth poached chicken, and the blanched juicy bean sprouts, covered in a mix of soy sauce and sesame oil, and either silky rice noodles in chicken broth or fluffy white rice.
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Ipoh is famous for its Bean Sprout Chicken Kuitew (flat rice noodles) and Rice. We prepare this dish with the recipe from the famous ‘Restoran Ayam Taugeh’ stall in Buntong, which name directly translates to “Restaurant Chicken Bean Sprout”.

 

The signature set is served in three components – the smooth poached chicken, and the blanched juicy bean sprouts, covered in a mix of soy sauce and sesame oil, and either silky rice noodles in chicken broth or fluffy white rice.
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Penang style Curry Chicken Mee has pieces of tau pok (fried beancurd puff), bean sprouts, cuttlefish, shrimp and cockles served in a bowl of coconut-based spicy savoury broth and topped up with a teaspoonful of sambal chilli to give that addictive spicy kick.

 

We serve our Curry Chicken Mee with the recipe from the famous Air Itam Sister Curry Mee in Penang, which is owned by the two Lim sisters now in their 80s.
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Bak Kut Teh is literally “meat bone tea” in Hokkien dialect. It is known to be originated from Klang – or more accurately, brought to Klang by the Chinese from Fujian, China.

 

Our stall serves the herbal type of the famous dish whereby the pork is simmered in a rich aromatic broth brewed with a complex mix of Chinese herbs and spices, as well as garlic. You can also find in the rich broth an array of ingredients like tau pok, tau kee, chinese mushrooms and pig innards.
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Bak Kut Teh is literally “meat bone tea” in Hokkien dialect. It is known to be originated from Klang – or more accurately, brought to Klang by the Chinese from Fujian, China.

 

Our stall serves the herbal type of the famous dish whereby the pork is simmered in a rich aromatic broth brewed with a complex mix of Chinese herbs and spices, as well as garlic. You can also find in the rich broth an array of ingredients like tau pok, tau kee, chinese mushrooms and pig innards.
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One signature dish at JB Handmade Pau stall is our Amy Yip paus (叶子楣大包)! The name of these humongous Amy Yip paus pays homage to the famous Hong Kong actress well-known for her large bosoms in the 1980s.

 

At this stall, you can also find fresh paus handmade daily by our chefs. The delicious pau fillings, such as chicken and pork marinated with a special recipe, are made with fresh ingredients for quality.
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Pork Noodles or Mee Hoon Kway (hand-torn noodles) is served in a bowl filled with a medley of ingredients like minced pork, meatballs, pig innards and vegetables and immersed in a light but flavourful pork broth. The ingredients come together in harmony to enhance the flavour of the soup and pairs perfectly with the springy noodles.

 

The pork porridge we serve is a “Teochew-styled porridge” (with rice grains intact) cooked with the same rich pork broth, accompanied with ingredients like minced pork, meatballs and pig innards.
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Pork Noodles or Mee Hoon Kway (hand-torn noodles) is served in a bowl filled with a medley of ingredients like minced pork, meatballs, pig innards and vegetables and immersed in a light but flavourful pork broth. The ingredients come together in harmony to enhance the flavour of the soup and pairs perfectly with the springy noodles.

 

The pork porridge we serve is a “Teochew-styled porridge” (with rice grains intact) cooked with the same rich pork broth, accompanied with ingredients like minced pork, meatballs and pig innards.
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No time to go Penang but craving for an authentic plate of Penang Loh Bak? You are now able to enjoy it right at Malaysia Boleh!.

 

On top of bringing over the authentic recipe from a more-than-half-a-century-old homemade-loh bak stall in Carnavon Street of Penang, we also specially import the five-spice powder from Penang. These Penang meat rolls are well-flavoured and deep-fried to a nice golden brown finish, and are usually served together with a choice of deep-fried beancurd, fritters and others.
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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Integer adipiscing erat eget risus sollicitudin pellentesque et non erat. Maecenas nibh dolor, malesuada et bibendum a, sagittis accumsan ipsum. Pellentesque ultrices ultrices sapien, nec tincidunt nunc posuere ut. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam scelerisque tristique dolor vitae tincidunt. Aenean quis massa uada mi elementum elementum. Nec sapien convallis vulputate rhoncus vel dui.
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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Integer adipiscing erat eget risus sollicitudin pellentesque et non erat. Maecenas nibh dolor, malesuada et bibendum a, sagittis accumsan ipsum. Pellentesque ultrices ultrices sapien, nec tincidunt nunc posuere ut. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam scelerisque tristique dolor vitae tincidunt. Aenean quis massa uada mi elementum elementum. Nec sapien convallis vulputate rhoncus vel dui.
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Thick slabs of bread (Roti Bakar) perfectly browned on both sides over a charcoal grill, and paired with a spread of kaya (coconut egg jam) and cold butter, accompanied with soft boiled eggs and a warm cup of fluffy Teh Tarik (pulled tea).

 

Roti Bakar, with Teh Tarik, makes for a quintessential Malaysian breakfast that everyone enjoys.
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This Fried Oyster dish (also known as orh luak) is a fragrant egg omelette with a thick starchy batter and topped with plump oysters, brought together by frying on high heat. It has a great combination of textures – fluffy, wet and runny, and accompanied with juicy oysters. The chilli sauce for dipping is also an excellent complement to the dish.

 

We prepare our Fried Oyster using the recipe from the famous Kah Kah Fried Oyster stall on Lor Selamat in Penang, which always has a long queue for its delicious Fried Oyster.
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This Fried Oyster dish (also known as orh luak) is a fragrant egg omelette with a thick starchy batter and topped with plump oysters, brought together by frying on high heat. It has a great combination of textures – fluffy, wet and runny, and accompanied with juicy oysters. The chilli sauce for dipping is also an excellent complement to the dish.

 

We prepare our Fried Oyster using the recipe from the famous Kah Kah Fried Oyster stall on Lor Selamat in Penang, which always has a long queue for its delicious Fried Oyster.
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Popiah, Teochew for “thin pancake”, is a thin paper-like crepe stuffed with rich ingredients such as cooked turnip, beansprouts, lettuce and eggs. It is often eaten as a snack or as an accompaniment to a meal.
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Commonly known as Char Koay Kak, the Penang fried carrot cake is thick chunky pieces of rice cake, cooked more savoury and less sweet than its Singapore counterpart.

 

Smooth and soft, these rice cakes come in the form of triangular wedges and are fried with egg and crunchy beansprouts. They are also accompanied with crispy lard that lends an aromatic flavour to the dish.
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Commonly known as Char Koay Kak, the Penang fried carrot cake is thick chunky pieces of rice cake, cooked more savoury and less sweet than its Singapore counterpart.

 

Smooth and soft, these rice cakes come in the form of triangular wedges and are fried with egg and crunchy beansprouts. They are also accompanied with crispy lard that lends an aromatic flavour to the dish.
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